Scubadoc’s Ten Foot Stop

November 22, 2009

U N D E R C U R R E N T O N L I N E U P D A T E

Filed under: News, Publication — admin @ 7:59 pm

Undercurrent — Consumer Reporting for
the Scuba Diving Community since 1975
www.undercurrent.org

Dive News

November 22, 2009

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Anatomy of a Dive Lawsuit – Part I: Dive veteran and frequent Undercurrent contributor Bret Gilliam wrote a report about a recent trial for which he was an expert witness and litigation consultant. The families of two divers gone missing and presumed dead while diving with the Okeanos Aggressor at Cocos Island filed a multi-million-dollar lawsuit against the Aggressor Fleet. The case involves issues directly affecting anyone diving with a dive operator anywhere in the world. Read Bret’s summary of the incident for free in the September issue – go to www.undercurrent.org and click on “Anatomy of a Dive Lawsuit. To read Part II about the ensuing trial and the verdict, you’ll have to subscribe! http://www.undercurrent.org/UCnow/join.shtml

Your Ticket to the DEMA Show: Dive shops knocked down the suggestion of having the annual DEMA trade show open to the public but you can skip the time and cost of four days’ worth of conference attendance and see the highlights online. The Underwater Channel filmed four episodes of the Orlando event earlier this month, each approximately 15 minutes long. Two hosts travel the trade floor and interview dive business reps about the latest wares they plan to sell to you, from shark dives and faster scooters to video housings and “diving jewelry.” See all four videos, titled “DEMA Show” on the top of the page here: www.theunderwaterchannel.tv/videos.

Make This Your 2010 Calendar: The British marine conservation group Bite-Back is selling a calendar with 12 shots by the world’s most famous underwater photographers and using the proceeds to fight overfishing and shark-finning. (It persuaded major U.K. supermarkets to stop selling threatened fish species, and convinced the only Michelin-starred Chinese restaurant to stop offering shark-fin soup.) Photographers like Amos Nachoum and David Doubilet offer up images of sharks, eels, rays and whales at their favorite dive sites. Buy it at www.bite-back.com/oceans_twelve.htm.

Accept My Special Offer: Accept my special offer to subscribe to the online edition of Undercurrent in the next 24 hours and I’ll send you FREE the all-new, 480 page 2010 Travelin’ Diver’s Chapbook. You just can’t plan a dive trip without the inside information Undercurrent has to offer. You no longer have to wait for an issue to arrive in the mail. — read it online on the first of the month for this new low price. And, with the all new 2010 Travelin’ Diver’s Chapbook you’ll have at hundreds upon hundreds of reviews of more than 200 dive resorts and liveaboards around the world. Water temperature, food quality, whether there are big fish left, is the diving really unlimited or are you held to two tanks a day, what rooms to avoid … everything you need to know to make your trip perfect. And Undercurrent members have scores of new reports, plus, important new stories on diver safety — how our reviewer drifted nearly three hours off the Florida Coast, rescue devices, that big law suit against the Aggressor Fleet, why diver’s don’t tell the truth on their medical forms, and much much more. All this for the special low price of $34.95 — half the regular price. If you’ve never subscribed before, go to http://www.undercurrent.org/halfprice. If you have an old username, you can use that — use coupon c10 and click on this link https://www.undercurrent.org/secure/UCnow/OMaccountCenter.php?omcoupon=c10 , or get a new username at http://www.undercurrent.org/halfprice . As an online member you can use our powerful search engine to access ten years of Undercurrent issues and Chapbooks, chock full of feature on travel, equipment, safety, and health. And, at anytime during the first year if you are dissatisfied for any reason, I’ll refund your full $34.95.

The Travelin’ Diver’s Chapbook: Chock full of hundreds of great dive travel reviews — the good, the bad, the ugly. Everything you need to know to plan your next trip. It’s mailed free to our subscribers but even though you don’t subscribe, you can still buy a copy at https://www.undercurrent.org/secure/UCnow/chapbook2010.html

How to Beat Airplane Carry-on Restrictions: I found a great way to fit all my stuff appropriately and bring it onboard without going over the over the carry-on limitations and luggage weight limits. Read about my solution in the October issue’s “A Smart Way to Beat Carry-on Restrictions,” available for free at Undercurrent

Diving Indonesia’s Raja Ampat, by Burt Jones and Maurine Shimlock: Here’s a definitive guide book on what the authors call “the greatest repository of tropical marine life on earth.” And anyone who has dived it knows they speak the truth. This 146-page book is filled with descriptions of mind-blowing dive sites, along with good descriptions of the area, the people and what you need to know to dive there. And the photos of unusual critters will knock your socks off. Whether or not you think you’ll ever get to Raja Ampat, you should own this book just to nurture your dreams. Order it now by going to Undercurrent and clicking on a photo of the cover, and our profits will go directly to tropical reef conservation.

Kudos to Undersea Hunter: We have to give this Cocos Island liveaboard a thumbs-up based on the story subscriber Bernadette Latin told us about her July trip, and how the crew went out of their way to help a struggling turtle. Read the details in our “Thumbs Up” piece from our October issue at Undercurrent

Disgusting Diners Eat Fish Alive: British newspapers are highlighting this sad-to-watch video (www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/6595481/Chinese-diners-eat-live-fish-in-YouTube-video.html) of a live fish, partly fried and still breathing and wriggling as Chinese diners laugh while eating it with chopsticks. It’s not a laughing matter, as scientific evidence shows that fish and other marine life do feel pain. The upside is this video has gotten 120,000 clicks on YouTube in just one week, and PETA is up in arms. A quoted Chinese embassy spokesperson was on the defensive, stating that Westerners do fox hunting and bullfighting. True, but laughing while eating a live fish is disgusting no matter what culture you are from. We can only hope PETA and other groups keep putting the pressure on China and other countries that cause overreaching damage to marine animals and their habitats.

Mexico Diving: I just made a brief trip to Baja, which I’ll soon write about, but if you’ve been south of the border and you have a heart for dogs, it has to get broken every time you’re in Mexico. OK, so this isn’t about diving but I still want to turn you on to a fantastic group of gringos, headed by a magnanimous young female veterinarian who regularly takes volunteers to Mexico to spay and neuter hundreds of dogs at a time, and rescue and bring back scores that are ready for adoption. I support Compassion Without Borders, both with my money and my time. Get details about the group and the “Meximutts” they care for at www.compassionwithoutborders.com.

See Video of Fish at 25,000 Feet: An international team led by the University of Aberdeen has photographed the deepest-living fish ever, swimming at levels of 25,000 feet below the surface. The bizarre-looking, pale-pink creatures have been found in the Pacific’s Japan Trench north of the equator, and a similar-looking but different species in the Kermadec Trench near New Zealand. See video of them swimming around in this BBC News article: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8353329.stm

Ben Davison, editor/publisher
Contact Ben


Website News

Divers’ Blogs: See what you’ve been missing from leading industry pundits: Bret Gilliam lambasts the “scuba police”, gives you the skinny on some maritime trivia, and recounts a horrifying incident and how one diver handled it all; Bob Halstead will keep you in stitches with his modeling tale and makes the case for brief dive briefings; John Bantin gives us the low-down on closed circuit rebreathers and why training is so important; and Doc Vikingo debunks the use of oxygen as a sure-fire speed-up in healing. These and other posts are available now for free at www.undercurrent.org/blog. [Note that you can comment and/or rate all of these posts - make your voice heard.]

The Divers’ Forum: If you have a question about which liveaboard to choose, or which dive computer I divers prefer, or looking for a buddy for a trip, or basically anything relating to diving, and haven’t found the answer yet — just post it on our Divers’ Forum (www.undercurrent.org/diving_forum). It’s available to the diving public for free. Or you may find the answer there already — there’s been lots of activity lately with posts about Cozumel to Comores Islands, and everywhere in between.

Website Tip: Our subscribers publish detailed reviews on dive trips around the world every day. There’s over 5,000 on our site and hey’re organized for efficient searching and retrieval. Start either at one of the reader report pages (start at http://www.undercurrent.org/UCnow/dive_reviews/all_destinations.html ) or dive destination guides (linked from http://www.undercurrent.org/UCnow/WorldIndx.shtml )

Dave Eagleray, webmaster


Note: Our travel writers never announce their purpose, are unknown to the destination, and receive no complimentary services or compensation from the dive operators or resort. Dive trips listed in our emails must be offered by a well-regarded operation that has been reviewed positively by our readers. The operator must include a special offer for Undercurrent subscribers and supporters. Undercurrent is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit organization and in some cases the operator has made a donation.

CSIDT™© Seminar

Filed under: News — admin @ 7:54 pm



Professional Association

CSI

Underwater Forensics

Commercial Scientific

Diver Technologists™©-

CSIDT

Sponsored by: Bermuda Triangle SCUBA of Asheville, NC

Lake Lure Police Department

And

Lastrada at Lake Lure- Italian Bar and Grill;

Seminar Details:


When: March 11th and 12th (Thursday & Friday) 2010 9:00 am till 5:00 pm

Registration forms are also available by fax


To Register: Please contact –Bermuda Triangle SCUBA of Asheville, NC-

828-252-8707 Fax number 828-255-7946


Standard Tuition: $155.00


Early Registration and payment must be submitted no later than March 02, 2010 5:00PM.
Early registration is suggested; Classroom setting-seating is limited

Registration includes:


Certificate of Completion/NCCJS Approved

• Attendee workbook and Study Guide

• A Fantastic Lunch at Lastrada at Lake Lure for both days

Menu available upon request


For information regarding Menu choices, Please call Bermuda Triangle SCUBA of Asheville @ 828-252-8707. They will fax you a copy of the complete menu.

** The fine people at Lastrada at Lake Lure are also offering a 10% discount on all meals for those who are attending the CSIDT seminar, beginning Wednesday afternoon and will continue through Saturday Lunch. This is not covered in the registration, rather an alternative after the each day’s seminar has ended.

Seminar Location:

Lake Lure Police Department; Lake Lure, NC

Speaker: Mack S. House Jr. CSIDT

Published Author, speaker, consultant and well known expert in the field of Underwater Forensic Science.

Recommended Offer:
Textbook: Underwater Forensics Research Commercial Scientific Diving $44.00
CSIDT Diver Logbook $37.00

Course Description:


This program is designed for divers in Law Enforcement, Nursing Professionals, EMS, Fire Department and First Responder professionals interested in or who may respond to an incident involving a submerged victim.

This seminar is very comprehensive and detailed, which will enable the participant to fully understand each topic covered.

This Professional Association CSI Underwater Forensics Commercial Scientific Diver Technologists Seminar is approved by:

The North Carolina Criminal Justice Standards -Training and Education Commission and may also be approved by NC Board of Nursing.


“This communication will serve as official notice that CJS will accept the listed presentation as being available to a NC criminal justice officer participating in the NC Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission Law Enforcement Officer Certificate Program, either at the intermediate or advanced level”.

Mark Dearry
Training System Manager/CJS

Learner Objectives:


At the completion of this two day program, you will be able to Understand and articulate:

Thursday’s Topics

§ Underwater Forensics and its application

§ The Respiratory System and important gas laws

§ Arterial gas embolism/cerebral gas embolism

§ The Structure and Function of the Lung

§ Pulmonary Barotrauma

§ The importance in reducing the Risks of Pulmonary Barotrauma

§ The Components of Intracellular and Extracellular fluid

§ The Pathophysiological aspects of Hyperbaric Exposure

§ The necessary Guidelines for Diving in Contaminated Water

§ Important Decontamination Protocols

__________________________________________________________________

Friday’s Topics

§ The drowning process and variations in terminology

§ Postmortem anatomical changes in the fluid medium; the body cooling rate

§ The six stages of decomposition

§ The protocols in Safe diving operations and procedures

§ Evidence preservation from the underwater environment

§ Rules of evidence; CSIDT crime scene investigations

§ The importance in preparing a court ready investigative report

§ Psychological considerations; Critical Incident

§ Underwater Forensics, Commercial Scientific Diving, CSIDT training

For those participants who need to stay overnight,

Special rates are being offered by Mt Village Chalet, Chimney Rock, NC.

1-877-682-2246.


Registration Form:

Professional Association CSI Underwater Forensics Commercial Scientific Diver Technologists©™:

Seminar Date: Thursday and Friday, March 11th & 12th 2010

Seminar Location: Lake Lure Police Department, Lake Lure, NC


Seminar Title: Pathophysiology and Diver Decontamination.

Seminar I.D: 031112201001


Each participant must fill out this form: Please print clearly

First Name: ___________________ Last Name: ________________________________

Profession: ___________________________________________________

Department Name: ______________________________________________

Address: ________________________________________________________________


Mailing address for Certification: ____________________________________________


City: _________________________: State: ______: Zip: ______________

Work Ph. __________________________ Home Ph. ____________________________

Email address: _______________________________________________

Payment is required at time of registration:

To register; please fax this form to Bermuda Triangle SCUBA of Asheville, NC

@ 828-255-7946:


Please call 828-252-8707 to make credit card payment and to receive confirmation number.


Photo I.D. must be presented at registration desk the morning of the seminar.

November 13, 2009

Fitness to Dive, Age, Chapter 7

Filed under: Article, Publication — admin @ 4:56 pm

Problem — The Older Diver
To my knowledge there is no specified age limit to sport diving.

Diving Concerns

  • Condition Related


Most elderly divers are not capable of sustaining the work load required by all but the least physically demanding dives. The majority of elderly divers do not exercise regularly or adequately.

  • Treatment Related

Physical training can definitely minimize the decline in physical capacity in older divers.

  • Diver Related

Chronological age and physiological age can differ markedly; and each individual ticks to his own genetic clock.

Risk Assessment

  • Risk from the Condition

General health, agility and stregth decrease with age. Maximum heart rate, oxygen uptake and lung compliance decrease with age. [Parker, 'The Sport Diving Medical']
Good screening is necessary. Older divers have a higher incidence of chronic diseases; i.e., cardiovascular disease and chronic lung disease. Appropriate screening evaluations of the heart and coronary arteries with exercise testing is useful in older divers before instituting a diving program.
Osteoporosis (men and women) increases with age and increased incidence of fractures becomes a factor.

  • Risks from treatment

The older diver is more prone to be taking multiple drugs and medicines, some of which have effects that are adverse to diving. These should be listed and evaluated prior to allowing diving. See web page at http://scuba-doc.com/drugsdiv.htm .

  • Risks to the Diver

–Atherosclerosis affects the blood flow to the brain, heart, kidneys and limb muscles and therefore the function of these organs.
–Inability to self rescue due to decreased strength from muscle atrophy would be an important consideration.
–The older diver is more prone to hypothermia due to decreased tissue perfusion, decreased fat stores and decreased metabolism.
–Decompression sickness increases with age. [Edmonds] This may be due to decreased tissue perfusion and arthritic changes in the joints.

Advising the Diver

Most very old divers arrange for a personal dive guide to assist them in suiting up, donning gear, managing their entrances and exits from the water and accompanying them during the dive. The problem comes in getting the elderly to recognize when the time comes to ask for help! It’s hard to get an old diver out of the water!

  • Potential for injury from future diving

Myocardial infarction, heart failure account for a high percentage of deaths while diving. [Caruso]
Increased risk of pulmonary edema [additive effects of pulmonary edema of diving with borderline heart failure from intrinsic heart disease.
Increased risk of fractures [hip]

Increased risk of decompression sickness
Inability to self rescue or manage unexpected water movements [current, surges, wave action].

  • Modifiers

Regular Checkups.
Good physical conditioning
Absence of cardiovascular-pulmonary disease
Mentally alert
Diving Experience
Alteration of diving profiles with shallower, shorter diving, longer and deeper safety stops and longer surface intervals

  • Dive or not dive


If an older diver is in good physical condition and is mentally alert enough to do adequate problem solving at depth, then I would personally have no qualms in certifying him to dive.
The older diver is more likely to take fewer chances and to obey the rules. There are few 70 year-old ‘Buccaneers’!

Genetic clocks

To my knowledge there is no specified age limit to sport diving. Chronological age and physiological age can differ markedly; and each individual ticks to his own genetic clock. This having been said, most elderly divers are not capable of sustaining the work load required by all but the least physically demanding dives. The majority of elderly divers do not exercise regularly or adequately. Physical training can definitely minimize the decline in physical capacity in older divers.

Good screening necessary

Older divers have a higher incidence of chronic diseases; i.e., cardiovascular disease and chronic lung disease. Atherosclerosis affects the blood flow to the brain, heart, kidneys and limb muscles and therefore the function of these organs. Appropriate screening evaluations of the heart and coronary arteries with exercise testing is useful in older divers before instituting a diving program.

“I’m gonna live (dive) forever!”

If a 90 year old is in good physical condition, able to perform self and buddy rescue and is mentally alert enough to do adequate problem solving at depth, then I would personally have no qualms in certifying him to dive.

Ask for Help

Most very old divers arrange for a personal dive guide to assist them in suiting up, donning gear, managing their entrances and exits from the water and accompanying them during the dive. The problem comes in getting us old GCFD’s (“geezer-codger-fogy- duffers”) to recognize when the time comes to ask for help! It’s darned hard to get an old surgeon out of the O.R. – but doubly hard to get an old diver out of the water!

Older-Safer!

The obverse may also be operative; the older diver is more likely to take fewer chances and to obey the rules. There are few 70 year-old ‘Buccaneers’!
======================================================================

Diving Teens

Problem — Teen Age Divers
Sport diving imposes no legal limits on age, but most diver training organizations require candidates to be 15 years old for full certification. Training is provided to younger candidates who receive conditional certification until age 15. Ordinarily, the minimum age is 12; below this age seems to be quite young to us.

Diving Concerns

Condition Related

Variable rate of growth

The rate of development, growth and maturity of teens varies greatly and the age which they can take up sport diving is not uniform because of the psychological, intellectual and physical factors.

Maturity

Traits that are important - good judgment, responsibility, attention to detail and respect for rules are traits that may be slow to develop in some teens.

They should be physically able to manage the gear and carry out self and buddy rescue.
They must be able to understand the physics and biology involved with an ability to understand the dangers without being frightened.

Diver Related

Generally, the ages 14-16 are the times to start–gifted and mature teens may possess the above abilities sooner. Of course, there is always the exception to the rule, and many 11, 12 and 13 year olds who are physically and mentally capable of handling the heavy equipment and the training can be taught to dive.

Fitness considerations for young divers should be directed towards emotional maturity, ability to learn and understand the requisite physiologic, physical and environmental data needed for safe diving, and towards strength requirements necessary for handling diving equipment.

Risk Assessment

Risk from the Condition

Growth plates Young divers should use dive profiles which minimize risk for decompression sickness to eliminate concern for injury to growing tissues, such as the growth plates of bones. There are no good studies that indicate that the growth plates (epiphyseal plates) are a particular problem — but supposition that an area of increased vascularity “might” be more susceptible to bubbles. Since the damage that can be done to bone is in direct proportion to the length of time at depth, it would appear that these factors should be restricted in the growing teen-ager who has a life-time of diving ahead. Arbitrary depths and times have to be chosen to maintain low levels of onboard nitrogen; carefully monitored ascent rates with safety deco stops are definitely suggested.

Patent foramen ovale

It is known that the rate of closure of a patent foramen ovale is highly variable and a certain percentage of children will not have closed their defect by age 10. Because of this late closure in some individuals, it is possible that the percentage of children with PFO and right to left shunt could be even higher than the known rate of 25% in the general population. Programs allowing compressed surface-supplied air (SSA) to be provided to children as young as 5 would seem to be conducive to venous gas accessing the arterial circulation with disastrous central nervous system manifestations.

Risks from treatment
[Not apropos]

Risks to the Diver

In addition, the child should be physically, mentally and emotionally mature enough to rescue a ‘buddy’ in distress. This final caveat may be the ‘kicker’ that would prevent a 10 year old from becoming certified.

Physically, the young diver should be near 45 kg. (108 lb.) and 150 cm. tall (60 inches). He/she should be able to handle the bulky diving equipment and should be able to enter and exit the water without difficulty. Cold stress and buoyancy control pose special problems for the person of smaller statue, particularly on the surface in a suit. Gear size can be reduced and smaller tanks utilized.

Advising the Diver
Potential for injury from future diving
Possible injury from damaged growth plates
Possible increased risk for decompression illness from incomplete closure of PFO
Possible bone and joint injury from heavy equipment
Possible injury from trauma from entry and exit
Possible inury from cold stress
Possible injury from difficult buoyancy control due to size and poorly fitting thermal gear

Modifiers

Good physical conditioning, large size for age
Absence of cardiovascular disease [PFO]
Mentally alert and ability to understand the physics/physiology of diving
Alteration of diving profiles with shallower, shorter diving, longer and deeper safety stops and longer surface intervals
Motivation

Dive or not dive

Teen Classes

I strongly recommend that children take lessons with other teens-not in a mixed class with adults; and, that the instructor be knowledgeable about teens, and have a supportive style without the “macho” attitude that some instructors exhibit, often humiliating members of the classes.

Should not be ‘dragooned’ by a parent or sibling

Finally, there is nothing worse than being “dragooned” into diving. For those who are too small to use diving equipment comfortably, or who are too young intellectually there are alternatives to diving which will prepare them for diving later, ie., swimming in waves and currents, underwater swimming, swimming with fins or kickboard and snorkeling offers a great transition to diving for youngsters.


Links

DOWNLOAD Teen Age Diving
by Maida Taylor, MD

Scuba Board Thread About Children Divers
[Contains Undercurrent Article by DocVikingo]

Why I Do Not Train Kids
by Larry “Harris” Taylor, PhD

References

http://www.scuba-doc.com/download/Teendive.zip
This is a downloadable article by Dr. Maida Taylor

Bar-Or-O: Pediatric Sports
Medicine for the Practitioner from Physiologic Principles to Clinical Applications, NY, Springer Verlag, 1983

Bar-Or-O: Climate and the Exercising Child-a review: Int J Sports Med 1980, 1:53

Branta C, Haubenstricker J, and Seefeldt V: Age changes in motor skills during childhood and adolescence. Exerc Sport Sci Rev 1984,12:467

Dembert ML, Keith JF; Evaluating the Potential pediatric scuba diver. Am J Dis Child 1986; 140:1135-1141




Narrative:
Sport diving imposes no legal limits on age, but most diver training organizations require candidates to be 15 years old for full certification. Training is provided to younger candidates who receive conditional certification until age 15. Ordinarily, the minimum age is 12; the age of ten seems to be quite young to us.

Variable rate of growth

The rate of development, growth and maturity of teens varies greatly and the age which they can take up sport diving is not uniform because of the psychological, intellectual and physical factors.

Maturity

Traits that are important -good judgment, responsibility, attention to detail and respect for rules are traits that may be slow to develop in some teens.

Intellectual maturity

They must be able to understand the physics and biology involved with an ability to understand the dangers without being frightened.

Scuba training should be a completely inappropriate activity for a young person unless the interest in diving comes from a strong personal interest.


Generally, the ages 14-16 are the times to start–gifted and mature teens may possess the above abilities sooner. Of course, there is always the exception to the rule, and many 11, 12 and 13 year olds who are physically and mentally capable of handling the heavy equipment and the training can be taught to dive.

Fitness considerations for young divers should be directed towards emotional maturity, ability to learn and understand the requisite physiologic, physical and environmental data needed for safe diving, and towards strength requirements necessary for handling diving equipment.

Physically, the young diver should be near 45 kg. (108 lb.) and 150 cm. tall (60 inches). He/she should be able to handle the bulky diving equipment and should be able to enter and exit the water without difficulty. Cold stress and buoyancy control pose special problems for the person of smaller statue, particularly on the surface in a suit. Gear size can be reduced and smaller tanks utilized.


Growth plates

Children divers should use dive profiles which minimize risk for decompression sickness to eliminate concern for injury to growing tissues, such as the growth plates of bones. There are no good studies that indicate that the growth plates (epiphyseal plates) are a particular problem — just supposition that an area of increased vascularity “might” be more susceptible to bubbles. Since the damage that can be done to bone is in direct proportion to the length of time at depth, it would appear that these factors should be restricted in the growing teen-ager who has a life-time of diving ahead. Arbitrary depths and times have to be chosen to maintain low levels of onboard nitrogen; carefully monitored ascent rates with safety deco stops are definitely suggested.

Patent foramen ovale

It is known that the rate of closure of a patent foramen ovale is
highly variable and a certain percentage of children will not have closed their defect by age 10. Because of this late closure in some individuals, it is possible that the percentage of children with PFO and right to left shunt could be even higher than the known rate of 25% in the general population. Programs allowing surface-supplied air (SSA) to be provided to children as young as 5 would seem to be conducive to bubbles accessing the arterial circulation with disastrous central nervous system manifestations.

‘Buddy’ responsibility

In addition, the child should be physically, mentally and emotionally mature enough to rescue a ‘buddy’ in distress. This final caveat may be the ‘kicker’ that would prevent a 10 year
old from becoming certified.

Teen Classes

I strongly recommend that children take lessons with other teens-not in a mixed class with adults; and, that the instructor be knowledgeable about teens, and have a supportive style without the “macho” attitude that some instructors exhibit, often humiliating members of the class.


Should not be ‘dragooned’ by a parent or sibling

Finally, there is nothing worse than being “dragooned” into diving. For those who are too small to use diving equipment comfortably, or who are too young intellectually there are alternatives to diving which will prepare them for diving later, ie., swimming in waves and currents, underwater swimming, swimming with fins or kickboard and snorkeling offers a great transition to diving for youngsters.

Decompression Sickness: Recently Added Articles in the Medical Literature

Filed under: Publication, Uncategorized — admin @ 12:56 pm

Neurological symptoms after a provocative dive: spinal DCS or anterior spinal artery syndrome?

Uzun G, Cakar E, Kiralp MZ, Carli A, Durmu? O, Senol MG, Mutluo?lu M, Uz O, Dinçer U, Ozçakar L.

Aviat Space Environ Med. 2009 Oct;80(10):898-9.PMID: 19817244 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

2.

Resolution and severity in decompression illness.

Vann RD, Denoble PJ, Howle LE, Weber PW, Freiberger JJ, Pieper CF.

Aviat Space Environ Med. 2009 May;80(5):466-71. Review.PMID: 19456008 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

3.

Sponge divers of the Aegean and medical consequences of risky compressed-air dive profiles.

Toklu AS, Cimsit M.

Aviat Space Environ Med. 2009 Apr;80(4):414-7.PMID: 19378916 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

4.

Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging of compressed air divers in diving accidents.

Gao GK, Wu D, Yang Y, Yu T, Xue J, Wang X, Jiang YP.

Undersea Hyperb Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;36(1):33-41.PMID: 19341126 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

5.

Recompression treatment for decompression illness: 5-year report (2003-2007) from National Centre for Hyperbaric Medicine in Poland.

Kot J, Si?ko Z, Micha?kiewicz M, Lizak E, Góralczyk P.

Int Marit Health. 2008;59(1-4):69-80.PMID: 19227740 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

6.

Guiding principles in choosing a therapeutic table for DCI hyperbaric therapy.

Antonelli C, Franchi F, Della Marta ME, Carinci A, Sbrana G, Tanasi P, De Fina L, Brauzzi M.

Minerva Anestesiol. 2009 Mar;75(3):151-61. Review.PMID: 19221544 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articlesFree article

7.

Pre-dive normobaric oxygen reduces bubble formation in scuba divers.

Castagna O, Gempp E, Blatteau JE.

Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009 May;106(2):167-72. Epub 2009 Feb 14.PMID: 19219451 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

8.

Spinal decompression sickness presenting as partial Brown-Sequard syndrome and treated with robotic-assisted body-weight support treadmill training.

Moreh E, Meiner Z, Neeb M, Hiller N, Schwartz I.

J Rehabil Med. 2009 Jan;41(1):88-9.PMID: 19197576 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

9.

Bubble formation and endothelial function before and after 3 months of dive training.

Pontier JM, Guerrero F, Castagna O.

Aviat Space Environ Med. 2009 Jan;80(1):15-9.PMID: 19180853 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

10.

Perfluorocarbon emulsions as a promising technology: a review of tissue and vascular gas dynamics.

Spiess BD.

J Appl Physiol. 2009 Apr;106(4):1444-52. Epub 2009 Jan 29. Review.PMID: 19179651 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

11.

A pilot study evaluating surfactant on eustachian tube function in divers.

Duplessis C, Fothergill D, Gertner J, Hughes L, Schwaller D.

Mil Med. 2008 Dec;173(12):1225-32.PMID: 19149344 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

12.

Bubble trouble: a review of diving physiology and disease.

Levett DZ, Millar IL.

Postgrad Med J. 2008 Nov;84(997):571-8. Review.PMID: 19103814 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

13.

Effects of tetrahydrobiopterin on venous bubble grade and acute diving-induced changes in cardiovascular function.

Glavas D, Bakovic D, Obad A, Palada I, Breskovic T, Valic Z, Brubakk AO, Dujic Z.

Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2009 Apr;29(2):100-7. Epub 2008 Dec 4.PMID: 19076728 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]Related articles

14.

MRI findings and clinical outcome in 45 divers with spinal cord decompression sickness.

Gempp E, Blatteau JE, Stephant E, Pontier JM, Constantin P, Pény C.

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15.

On beginning a second century of decompression sickness research: where are we and what comes next?

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16.

Relation between right-to-left shunts and spinal cord decompression sickness in divers.

Gempp E, Blatteau JE, Stephant E, Louge P.

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November 12, 2009

Finding Quality Dive Center Staff

Filed under: News — admin @ 10:09 am

Here is a letter we received that warrants your further interest:

Dear  Naui  Dive Centre Manager,Owner or instructor

As a dive centre owner I have an annual problem of finding quality staff that fit my specific requirements for skills and languages.

If you have the same problem please have a look at www.jobsinscuba.com.

The aim of the site is to provide a more precise match between Employee and Employer. It also caters for non instructor level candidates and Internship positions.

As the site is still in under development we would welcome any feedback or requests.

Membership is free for the first 500 job posts by employers.
Membership is free for the first 500 resume posts by employees.

Best Regards
The JOBSINSCUBA.COM Team
www.jobsinscuba.com

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